Re-Conceptualising Fashion Shows

 

“A perfect storm of fashion, art, technology and sound captured by dancing robotic cameras who fed the whole thing live to the Internet….”
Alexander McQueen: Spring 2010 RTW 

“A perfect storm of fashion, art, technology and sound captured by dancing robotic cameras who fed the whole thing live to the Internet….”
Alexander McQueen: Spring 2010 RTW 

 

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1 to 1 Shopping

 

 

 

Fashioning the future: Augmented reality allows trying on of outfits
San Francisco – Online retailer Tobi.com has launched a virtual fitting room that can be accessed from the home. Customers can try items on through innovative use of a webcam and motion sensors are used to rate styles with the wave of a hand. They can also post pictures immediately to Facebook in order to see what friends think.

Fashioning the future: Augmented reality allows trying on of outfits
San Francisco – Online retailer Tobi.com has launched a virtual fitting room that can be accessed from the home. Customers can try items on through innovative use of a webcam and motion sensors are used to rate styles with the wave of a hand. They can also post pictures immediately to Facebook in order to see what friends think.

 

 

Mortiz Waldemeyer

I have been meaning to do a blog entry about Mortiz Waldemeyer’s work for some time. I first heard him present his work during a keynote at the ISEA09 event in Belfast this summer… I was lucky enough to hear him present again at Central Saint Martins a few weeks ago, which was even more engaging and inspiring!

Mortiz trained as an engineer at Kings College in London and began his journey working for Philips at their Innovation Lab… 
He is the technical “know how” behind many high end fashion and interior collaborative projects that can truly be defined as “cutting edge”.  The projects were introduced with an explanation of the original concept, the methods of production and a concluded with reflection of how the end outcome performed and was received. I thought this was a really inspiring and insightful way to present such unique creations.

For example an interactive LED chandelier embellished with swarovski crystals, designed to display text messages.

High end fashion collaborations  working with the likes of Hussein Chalayan  to produce the 20 years of fashion collection and a following project invited him to make a video dress) concept reality…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A project with Zaha Hadid (pictured above) to design LED technology into Zaha’s futuristic kitchen interiors. 

 

He has received commissions from the music industry to integrate laser technology into clothing for Mika’s music video and was recently invited to design a laser jacket for Bono’s stage performance. 

A lot of his project’s have been heavily financed and supported by the likes of swarovski without which it would have been impossible to produce as the level of manpower, technical skill and material cost exceeds traditional production processes above and beyond!

The projects were introduced with an explanation of the original concept, the methods of production and a concluded with reflection of how the end outcome performed and was received. I thought this was a really inspiring and insightful way to present such unique creations. 

I was blown away by the level of skill, technical ability, methodical thinking and innovation invested in each of these projects… He uses LED technology is alternative ways and really pushes the boundaries to help others realise a concept and make it a reality.
For further explorations check out his blog or follow his tweets.

Build Your Own Bag

The bYOB concept was the creation of the Object-Based Media Group at the MIT Media Lab, Gauri Nanda, Adrian Cable and V. Michael Bove Jr (2004)

“envisioning a conversation between a handbag, a scarf and a dress”

The intelligent fabric patches/swatches can be assembled to create a handbag (or any fashion ensemble). Each patch contains different technology functions that allow the creation to perform once connected. The video explains the process, function and use…

Its a fantastic example of interactive customisation, allowing the user/ wearer / co-designer to adapt the pieces to new scenarios. Its also a cleverly engineered concept for transformable fashion as it has been designed for assembly and disassembly.

Seam- Less



I have been thinking about clothkit/kit fashion… Is there a toolkit that will allow anybody to create their own clothing?

Cloth-kits were a 70’s phenomenon of pre-printing garment patterns onto fabric, requiring the user to cut along the pre-printed lines, assemble and stitch. Then in the 90’s visionary fashion designer Issey Miyake took the concept to a whole new level when he introduced A-POC (a piece of cloth).

To create A-POC an industrial weaving machine is controlled by a programmed computer, which produces continuous tubes of fabric, which form both shape and pattern, producing seamless garments requiring no needle and thread! To assemble the wearer cuts along the pre-.marked lines, to adapt shape and length and then the garment is ready to wear!

This patent-pending process has been a closely guarded industry secret, which has the potential to provide design solutions at a time when we are rethinking and questioning our production and consumption. Prof Toshiko Mori, an architect at the Harvard Graduate School of Design referred to A-POC as a high tech, high design, low-cost solution.

Wear You Twitter

PaperTweet3d: Augmented Reality T-shirts from squidder on Vimeo.
This short little video has been produced by squidder using a FLARtoolKit.  This is an early proto-type of their concept check out their website for more info…

Hussein Chalayan – Shoreditch Town Hall

I went down to Shoreditch Town Hall last wednesday night for a talk about creativity in London. Hussein Chalayan was part of a panel of creative experts who reflected on how London has impacted their work and them as individuals.

The talk was really interesting as it talked about London being a platform for creativity by attracting designers and artisans from all over the world.

The second half allowed the audience to poise questions to the panel, the majority were for Chalayan and about the inspiration behind his 2007 collection. He said the collection was inspired by 111 years of fashion and reflects a political atmosphere influenced dress code. By morphing clothing together it mechanically changes the complexity and language of the clothing.