The F Factory – LIMITED EDITION experiences

Fendi will be playing quite a role in the event this year, introducing the F Factory, a limited-edition retail project in the Miami Design District’s Moore Building (home to Zaha Hadid’s “Elastica” permanent exhibition), starting November 30 2009 and running until Christmas.

 

The shop will feature the brand’s most coveted bags, complete with Fendi’s Roman craftsmen on-site to personalize each one. But in true Basel form, art and culture will infuse the retail. Graffiti artist Andre is creating three needlepoint panels live in three 60-minute “performances” in the space, which will then be stitched into a unique Fendi bag.

You can buy your own Fendi Baguette Needlepoint Stitch Kit, designed by Silvia Venturini Fendi for $995!

Other collaborations include Moritz Waldemeyer’s collaboration with Fendi to create six custom-made Gibson guitars with Silvia Venturini Fendi, which will project lights on the walls when played by American band OK Go.

The Limited Edition Experiences program in the Miami Design District. Launched by Dacra, a real estate company that owns 80% of the 18-block area that constitutes the Miami Design District, Miami’s Limited Edition Experiences program brings together designers like Cynthia Rowley,Duncan QuinnChristopher RossMaison Martin Margiela, and Marni, all of whom engage consumers with a series of initiatives ranging from pop-up stores to limited-edition wares, in-store events, documentary screenings, and more.

Luxury fashion engaging in experiential goods and services… could this be the new Eco Luxury market of the future? I can’t wait to see how these pop up projects proceed!

For more info visit website

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Co-Everything: Defining Co-Design for fashion and textiles

Friday 6th November ‘09
3.30pm – 5pm
Lecture Theatre, Chelsea Millbank
 
TFRG / PhD Student Jen Ballie presents:‘Co-Everything: Defining Co-design for Fashion and Textiles’
Co-design is an all-encompassing term to describe participatory action, but how does it fit fashion? This presentation will explore a series of co-design terms and define them within a fashion context, to offer a series of solutions for designers for discussion with the audience.
If you are a undergraduate/ postgraduate student from the University of the Arts, London and have an interest in this area please come along or contact me or more info.

 

Junky Styling “Wardrobe Surgery”

Junky Styling “Wardrobe Surgery” by Kerry Seager and Annika Sanders is available to purchase via their website. Junky Styling are a fashion brand who upcycle clothing to create new wearables and they offer a wardrobe surgery consultancy service that allows consumers to update their wardrobe using existing garments.

Working with used and already constructed clothing can be restricting but they have engineered this element into their design aesthetic and the overall look of the transformed garment is both stylish and wearable. A must have book for any fashion DIY enthusiast or any fashion consumer. Wouldn’t a few tips and tricks to update our wardrobe be valuable?

Vogue’s DIY Section

 

Reading the June Issue of Vogue I was so excited to see several features on”customising fashion”.
This issue features a guide by fashion designer Ederm showing “how to” customise a jacket. The step by step guide is  beautifully illustrated with photographs which breaks down the method and process. 
I think a high fashion magazine like Vogue adopting DIY methods reflects the rise in Make Do and Mend movements. Sewing machine and haberdashery sales are on the increase and people are seeking out innovative ways to engage in fashion.
In this current economic climate and with a growing concern around environmental issue’s we are asked to question our consumption. People are beginning to be a little more creative with their money, effort and time. I find the concept of collective creativity really inspiring. 
I have attached some photos from Vogue and I cant wait to see if their are any new articles in the new issue!

vogue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reading the June Issue of Vogue I was so excited to see several features on”customising fashion”.

This issue features a guide by fashion designer Ederm showing “how to” customise a jacket. The step by step guide is beautifully illustrated with photographs which breaks down the method and process. 

I think a high fashion magazine like Vogue adopting DIY methods reflects the rise in Make Do and Mend movements. Sewing machine and haberdashery sales are on the increase and people are seeking out innovative ways to engage in fashion.

In this current economic climate and with a growing concern around environmental issue’s we are asked to question our consumption. People are beginning to be a little more creative with their money, effort and time. I find the concept of collective creativity really inspiring. 

I have attached some photos from Vogue and I cant wait to see if their are any new articles in the new issue!

Burda Style’s New Projects

The open source sewing community  Burda Style are dividing the “How To” section on their platform under two new categories – projects and techniques.

They have blogged a sneak peak of the new “projects” section. The projects area will allow creations to be easily categorised under a number of different descriptions such as season, material, garment type and style…

All  techniques will be filed under a “learning” category.

burda style projects

I love the open source element of Burda Style as it networks  a global community of sewing enthusiasts ( with over 200,000 members)allowing them to share skills and expertise. The platform supports the novice through to the expert and allows users to communicate amongst themselves to support, critique and compliment each others creations. 

The new sections under construction look to improve the navigation and usability and Im excited to see the developments.

Gok’s Fashion Fix

Gok’s Fashion fix is back! I enjoyed the customisation theme of season one as Gok presented tips and tricks showing how to adapt high street clothing to create bespoke looks.

The new season explores new approaches taking viewers on a journey towards creating the perfect capsule wardrobe of interchangeable pieces selected to co-ordinate. This considerate approach encourages us to apply more rigour to our fashion consumption. Gok’s new mantra of buy less and wear more demonstrates that investing in clothing chosen to co-ordinate can create maximum looks with minimal pieces.

It’s a good mantra and it challenges us to question do we really wear everything in out wardrobe?

I also like the subject of high street v high fashion as Gok battles it out each week to style high street fashion to compete against high end designer fashion.

1239735600-652136-goksfash-12391013860To compete against bespoke tailoring and luxury fabric he styles and adapts high street fashion on a budget by cutting, stitching, pinning and tucking. All looks are styled and paraided on the catwalk at the end of the show with the audience voting for their favourute looks.

 

The show is packed with lots of tips and tricks to activly engage with fashion to maximise the efficiency of our wardrobes by creating looks to suit our body shape and styled to accommodate our daily functions. The customisation themes encourages DIY practice and with an increase in sewing machine sales there is a growing trend in make do and mend.

 

Visit the fashion fix website for further info

DIY designer clothing and accessories

The Guardian and The Observer have launched  DIY ethical fashionmake-your-own-bag-make-yo-011make-your-own-bag-make-yo-010: Make your own designer clothes and accessories.

They have collaborated with designers to create step-by-step “how to” guides illustrated with beautiful photographs taking the maker on a journey of marking out, cutting and sewing to create bespoke fashion and accessories.

Allowing you to make your own:

Celia Birtwell stencil print bag
Jade Jagger bracelet
Stephen Jones hat
Vivienne Westwood dress

This offers insights into the design process and allows consumers to create bespoke goods at affordable prices. The hands on approach also allows us to engage in craft and DIY at a time when we are questioning our consumption, providing an alternative to mass produced goods that don’t cost a fortune.