Fast Fashion & Co-Design: Working Together

I designed and facilitated a workshop last Friday for MA Textile students at Chelsea College of Art & Design. The workshop was part of a piece I am working on for TED’S Ever & Again publication on upcycling textiles. It is an outcome of an AHRC funded research project directed by RebeccaEarley .

The workshop was titled Fast Fashion & Co-Design: working together

I used co-design to “orchestrate creative conversations” a term coined by Leadbeater (2009) to inspire collaborative concepts. We borrowed IDEO ‘s 3 core concept of design thinking to structure the workshop… It was divided into 3 sections… empathy, prototyping and storytelling.

I really enjoyed working with the students to explore these concepts and they presented some really interesting ideas and exciting solutions.

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The F Factory – LIMITED EDITION experiences

Fendi will be playing quite a role in the event this year, introducing the F Factory, a limited-edition retail project in the Miami Design District’s Moore Building (home to Zaha Hadid’s “Elastica” permanent exhibition), starting November 30 2009 and running until Christmas.

 

The shop will feature the brand’s most coveted bags, complete with Fendi’s Roman craftsmen on-site to personalize each one. But in true Basel form, art and culture will infuse the retail. Graffiti artist Andre is creating three needlepoint panels live in three 60-minute “performances” in the space, which will then be stitched into a unique Fendi bag.

You can buy your own Fendi Baguette Needlepoint Stitch Kit, designed by Silvia Venturini Fendi for $995!

Other collaborations include Moritz Waldemeyer’s collaboration with Fendi to create six custom-made Gibson guitars with Silvia Venturini Fendi, which will project lights on the walls when played by American band OK Go.

The Limited Edition Experiences program in the Miami Design District. Launched by Dacra, a real estate company that owns 80% of the 18-block area that constitutes the Miami Design District, Miami’s Limited Edition Experiences program brings together designers like Cynthia Rowley,Duncan QuinnChristopher RossMaison Martin Margiela, and Marni, all of whom engage consumers with a series of initiatives ranging from pop-up stores to limited-edition wares, in-store events, documentary screenings, and more.

Luxury fashion engaging in experiential goods and services… could this be the new Eco Luxury market of the future? I can’t wait to see how these pop up projects proceed!

For more info visit website

Co-Everything: Defining Co-Design for fashion and textiles

Friday 6th November ‘09
3.30pm – 5pm
Lecture Theatre, Chelsea Millbank
 
TFRG / PhD Student Jen Ballie presents:‘Co-Everything: Defining Co-design for Fashion and Textiles’
Co-design is an all-encompassing term to describe participatory action, but how does it fit fashion? This presentation will explore a series of co-design terms and define them within a fashion context, to offer a series of solutions for designers for discussion with the audience.
If you are a undergraduate/ postgraduate student from the University of the Arts, London and have an interest in this area please come along or contact me or more info.

 

Build Your Own Dress

Studio 28 Couture offers a bespoke dress service allowing customers to co-create their own clothing via a “build your own application”.
This easy to use application allows the user to select dress shape, fit and apply colour or pattern via swatches provided, the fabric swatches change seasonally. The options presented provide lots of variations regardless of opting for either cotton or jersey fabrics.
Their service is marketed to provide affordable clothing that is unique and invites the consumer to participate in the design process. All dresses are made by hand in NYC and take approx 3 weeks to arrive.
I think it would be interesting if there were more fashion experiences presented this way. Studio 28 Couture are offering a similar solution to style|shake another bespoke dress creator website which I blogged about a while back…
A Style|Shake Creation
Style|Shake are evolving rapidly and have integrated a wedding service into their service! They offer affordable personalised fashion and their dresses retail between £35-65.
I have uploaded a youtube video of the Style|Shake process:
Both are a fantastic add on to traditional online shopping and a great way to personalise your wardrobe or even create that dress you have wanted for a long time but haven’t been able to find or don’t feel confident or skilled enough to produce independently.
But, how could these services be expanded upon to allow consumers to participate further in the design process? Can such services support upskilling or integrate upcycling into their business models?
I think it’s fantastic that both solutions are affordable and easy to use and cant wait to see how they evolve.

Junky Styling “Wardrobe Surgery”

Junky Styling “Wardrobe Surgery” by Kerry Seager and Annika Sanders is available to purchase via their website. Junky Styling are a fashion brand who upcycle clothing to create new wearables and they offer a wardrobe surgery consultancy service that allows consumers to update their wardrobe using existing garments.

Working with used and already constructed clothing can be restricting but they have engineered this element into their design aesthetic and the overall look of the transformed garment is both stylish and wearable. A must have book for any fashion DIY enthusiast or any fashion consumer. Wouldn’t a few tips and tricks to update our wardrobe be valuable?

Counterfeit Chic

 

Outsapop did a great blog post on “Counterfeit Chic” – a blog on fashion and intellectual property run by U.S Law Professor Susan Scafidi (the first law professor to ever offer a course in fashion law!)
She used an example of Project Runway finalist, Kenley Collins who has been challenged for her final collection’s similarity to Balenciaga.
It raises some questions around ethics in the fashion world and when we begin to in dispute a design outcomes originality we begin to interrogate the design process and challenge how fashion trends evolve…
I love street fashion and through my undergraduate studies I found the work of anthropologist Ted Polhemus really inspiring. His research has explored ‘street style’ which he defines as culture having a monopoly on the upper classes when iconic trends bubble up from underground movements. This bubble up effect challenges the dictatorship of high-end fashion.
We are possibly more tuned into street style now than ever before and I think it’s transforming on many levels with blogging playing a pivotal role. Blog’s like The Sartorialist, The Cool Hunter, /streetstyl.es/ (and many, many more!) report on fashion derived from all ends of the spectrum with a focus on how is put together and styled to create a ‘look’.
We can say fashion trends bubble up and trickle down… So once a trend or key look has gone full circle, who has inspired you?
With all that fashion going around it’s difficult not to feel inspired but on what level do we reprocess that inspiration into our own design process and how does the outcome impact what already exists?
I think Outsapop made two interesting points she mentions that designers are trained therefore we are equipped with tools, knowledge and process which should allow us to contribute something more.
Her blog is a fantastic resource for fashion DIY’ers with how to tips and tricks and she has an amazing skill of pulling huge amounts of information together and re-presenting through customisation offerings. Her second point was that fashion DIY’ers are in a different category they are not trained with specialist skills therefore not fully equipped. I think this is a valid point… by using catwalk creations for inspiration they can begin to ask questions and explore how fashion is designed, produced and styled.
I’ll close with the words of the late Coco Chanel
“Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.”

Outsapop did a great blog post on “Counterfeit Chic” – a blog on fashion and intellectual property run by U.S Law Professor Susan Scafidi (the first law professor to ever offer a course in fashion law!)
She used an example of Project Runway finalist, Kenley Collins who has been challenged for her final collection’s similarity to Balenciaga.

It raises some questions around ethics in the fashion world and when we begin to in dispute a design outcomes originality we begin to interrogate the design process and challenge how fashion trends evolve…

I love street fashion and through my undergraduate studies I found the work of anthropologist Ted Polhemus really inspiring. His research has explored ‘street style’ which he defines as culture having a monopoly on the upper classes when iconic trends bubble up from underground movements. This bubble up effect challenges the dictatorship of high-end fashion.
We are possibly more tuned into street style now than ever before and I think it’s transforming on many levels with blogging playing a pivotal role. Blog’s like The Sartorialist, The Cool Hunter, /streetstyl.es/ (and many, many more!) report on fashion derived from all ends of the spectrum with a focus on how is put together and styled to create a ‘look’.
We can say fashion trends bubble up and trickle down… So once a trend or key look has gone full circle, who has inspired you?
With all that fashion going around it’s difficult not to feel inspired but on what level do we reprocess that inspiration into our own design process and how does the outcome impact what already exists?

I think Outsapop made two interesting points she mentions that designers are trained therefore we are equipped with tools, knowledge and process which should allow us to contribute something more.
Her blog is a fantastic resource for fashion DIY’ers with how to tips and tricks and she has an amazing skill of pulling huge amounts of information together and re-presenting through customisation offerings. Her second point was that fashion DIY’ers are in a different category they are not trained with specialist skills therefore not fully equipped. I think this is a valid point… by using catwalk creations for inspiration they can begin to ask questions and explore how fashion is designed, produced and styled.

I’ll close with the words of the late Coco Chanel
“Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.”

 

Oxfam DIY

Picture 2Oxfam are hosting a DIY section at their Camden store with the help of fashion stylist to the stars Mrs Jones who has styled the likes of Kyle and The Killers…

She will be running a series of workshops within the store and be on hand to offer customisation tips & tricks. This is an exciting way to re-style and re-use reclaimed materials. Offering such support has the potential to inspire people to be more creative with discarded clothing…

Running parallel to the workshops are DIY tools online and a DIY fashion competition. Visit their website for more information…Picture 1